Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Happy New Year Everyone

Happy New Year and Blessed Feast Day of the Circumcision of Our Lord and/or Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God, depending on which calendar you happen to be on at this particular moment.  I shift between calendars as a fish who knows the Panama Canal like the back of his fin.  For me, New Year’s eve is typically a seafood night and tonight we are having a bunch of shrimp.  I am also making buffalo chicken dip, which was a hit at the choir party this year. 

 

New Year’s Day is a special anniversary for me, as I have posted before on the blog.  January 1st, 2006 was the day I finally made the personal commitment to join the Church.  A friend agreed to go with me to that first Mass and I am forever grateful.  I think I have missed Sunday Mass 5 times since then, maybe, and most of them weren’t my fault.  Later on that year, I emailed a priest at my parish and that’s when it really picked up speed.

 

Deo Gratias. 

2 comments:

Moonshadow said...

Honestly, I had never heard of the feast of the circumcision until a couple of summers ago when two Baptist youth ministers ridiculed the feast in a podcast.

I just told them it was the octave of Christmas and that the feast had been changed to "Mary, Mother of God." Believe it or not, that switch didn't go over any better with them. :-)

And this year, I got a similar opportunity to explain the holiday to yet another Baptist, my MIL. This time, I didn't shy away from Christ's circumcision but emphasized the naming part of a Jewish bris ... that he was named "Jesus" which means "God saves."

For some reason, the concluding verse of the Gospel reading had made an impression on me that day, "he was named Jesus, the name given him by the angel before he was conceived in the womb." I think because I remembered the angel's elaboration on the name in Matthew's Gospel: "you are to name him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins."

Matt said...

Ironically, replacing the Feast of the Circumcision was quite a Marian move, so you would think Baptists would be more inclined to care about the Circumcision.

Of course with the older feast comes the prophecies of Simeon and Anna.

I'm not really in favor of the "replacement" feasts in most cases. I have a hard time seeing what they have added in terms of value to our liturgical year. There is a theological depth in the old calendar that is lost in the new. The new is meant to be functional above all else. Maybe with one exception...

I think having a feast on the Sunday after Christmas for the Holy Family is a good move since in today's world the family is under such assault.

"The whole truth is generally the ally of virtue; a half-truth is always the ally of some vice." - G.K. Chesterton